Northampton MA Real Estate | Carla Ness - Delap Real Estate


As a first-time homebuyer, it is easy to feel plenty of optimism as you search for your dream residence. And if you find your ideal house, it may seem likely that a home seller will accept your offer on the residence right away.

However, it is important to remember that a home seller might reject a first-time homebuyer's proposal, regardless of whether this homebuyer submits a competitive offer. In this scenario, a homebuyer needs to know how to move forward and continue to pursue his or her perfect residence.

What should a first-time homebuyer do if a home seller rejects an offer on a home? Here are three tips that every first-time homebuyer needs to know.

1. Learn from the Experience

If a home seller rejects an offer on a house, there is no need to worry. In fact, a first-time homebuyer may be able to resubmit an offer and find out why a home seller rejected his or her initial offer.

For example, a first-time homebuyer may lack financing at the time that he or she submits an offer on a house. But if a homebuyer gets approved for a mortgage and returns with a new offer, he or she may be more likely than before to gain a home seller's approval.

On the other hand, a homebuyer should be ready to move forward with a home search if necessary. Thus, if a home offer is rejected, try not to get too emotional. Instead, a homebuyer should be prepared to reenter the housing market and start his or her search for the perfect home from stage one.

2. Don't Dwell on the Past

For a first-time homebuyer, it can be frustrating and annoying to conduct a home search, find the ideal home and receive a rejection after a proposal to buy the house is submitted. But there is no reason to dwell on the past for too long, as doing so may force a homebuyer to miss out on opportunities to pursue other residences.

Remember, the housing market often features dozens of outstanding houses to match all homebuyers' price ranges. This means if you receive a rejection on one home proposal, you can always restart a home search. And ultimately, a diligent homebuyer should have no trouble discovering a terrific residence, even if his or her initial offer on a residence is rejected.

3. Consult with a Real Estate Agent

A real estate agent is a housing market expert who understands what it takes to submit a competitive offer on a house. Therefore, he or she will help you prepare a fair offer on a home before you submit it.

If a home offer is rejected, a real estate agent can help you alleviate stress. This housing market professional may be able to explain why the offer was rejected and help you plan your next steps in the homebuying journey.

Don't worry if your first offer on a house is rejected – conversely, use these tips, and you can move one step closer to acquiring a stellar residence that matches or exceeds your expectations.


Once you have found the home that you want to live in, put in the offer, and start the process of closing on a home, you may feel like you’re “home free.” The hard part may technically be over, but there’s one more important thing that you need to think about before you get the keys to your place: Closing costs. 

A few days before you head to sign all of your paperwork to close on the home, your lender will send you a detailed report of different closing costs that you need to pay upon the settlement of the property. 


Closing Costs Defined


Closing costs are what you pay to the lender and third parties. These are due at the time of closing on the property and must be paid up front. You should estimate that your closing costs will be between 2 and 5 percent of the purchase price of the home.


Everything Included In Closing Costs


Closing costs cover both one-time and recurring fees that are a part of your home purchase. The one-time fees are things that are generally associated with buying the home. These would include attorneys fees, lender fees, home inspection fees, document prep fees, underwriting fees, credit report fees, and realtor fees. You’ll also need a bank issued check for your down payment at this time.  


At closing, an escrow account will be set up. This is like a forced savings account that will be drawn from to cover things like taxes, insurance, loan interest, and title insurance. These are all very important costs that are a part of buying a home.     


Do Your Homework Ahead Of Time


The best way to deal with closing costs is to be prepared ahead of time. Talk to your lender in order to get an estimate of the closing costs. From there, you’ll need to decide if you need to finance your closing costs or simply pay them up front. There are advantages to both approaches. Sometimes, lenders will look at you as less favorable if you need to finance all of your closing costs. It all depends on the terms of your loan. This is why research is vital.


Compare Rates And Lenders


It’s important not to go with the first lender you talk to. Get some recommendations from your realtor and friends to see who might be a good fit for you. Every lender specializes in something different, so you want to be sure that who you chose is a good fit for you. 


The most important thing that you can do with closing costs and the financing of your home is to get educated!     



A homebuying negotiation may cause your stress levels to rise. However, as you work toward purchasing your dream house, there is no need to worry. In fact, there are many ways that you can limit stress as you finalize a home purchase, including:

1. Discuss Your Homebuying Concerns with Family Members and Friends

Family members and friends offer plenty of support. Thus, these loved ones are happy to listen to you and help you in any way possible, no matter what happens during a homebuying negotiation.

Don't be afraid to ask family members and friends for homebuying advice, either. These loved ones may be able to share their past homebuying negotiation experiences with you. And by doing so, your family members and friends could provide you with valuable insights that may help you move one step closer to acquiring your ideal residence.

2. Consider the Big Picture

Buying a home likely will be one of the biggest transactions that you'll complete in your lifetime. At the same time, it is important to note that there are plenty of fish in the sea. Therefore, you should try to remember that even if a home purchase agreement falls through, dozens of high-quality houses are still available in cities and towns nationwide.

Sometimes, it helps to take a step back during a homebuying negotiation. If you can inhale and try to relax, you may be better equipped than ever before to stay calm, cool and collected during a negotiation. With a fresh perspective, you could boost the likelihood of coming to terms with a seller and finalizing a home purchase agreement.

3. Consult with a Real Estate Agent

When it comes to purchasing a house, there is no need to embark on the homebuying journey alone. Fortunately, if you hire a real estate agent, you can receive expert support as you navigate the homebuying journey.

A real estate agent understands the stress associated with purchasing a house and will do everything possible to help you alleviate your homebuying worries. He or she can explain the homebuying process and respond to any concerns or questions. Plus, a real estate agent can negotiate with a seller's agent on your behalf to help you get the best price on your dream residence.

Furthermore, a real estate agent provides support after a seller accepts your offer to purchase a residence. A real estate agent will help you set up a home inspection, conduct this inspection with you and ensure you can complete a full review of the inspection results. In addition, a real estate agent can help you prepare for a home closing and ensure you can finalize a home purchase as quickly as possible.

There is no need to let stress get the best of you during a homebuying negotiation. By using the aforementioned tips, you can keep your stress levels in check as you negotiate a home purchase and accelerate the process of purchasing your dream home.


Image by Paul Brennan from Pixabay

Now that you decided to move into a luxury home, you need to determine whether you are going to build one or buy a luxury home that already exists. There are pros and cons to both sides of the coin. Also, in most cases, building is going to be more expensive. Still, you also get to choose materials and have the newest technology built-in instead of having to upgrade on top of the purchase of an existing home.

Buying a Luxury Home

The main benefit of buying a luxury home is that you can be in your home in as little as a couple of weeks if you are doing a cash transaction or in 30 to 60 days if you are getting financing. The cost of buying a home is also less than building in most cases. You might find some areas of the country where building is less expensive, but that would be rare.

The biggest con to buying a luxury home is that people rarely find a home that has everything they are looking for. Most people settle for a home that has almost everything and either do without or add the feature on later. That depends on the feature and whether the feature is a deal-breaker.

Building a Luxury Home

The best part of building a luxury home is that you can choose the location of the home. Find that perfect piece of property, whether you want a small lot or thousands of acres, and then find the perfect place on the property for your home. On larger properties, you might decide to put your home near a lake or pond on the property, or on top of a high hill with a gorgeous view.

Consider your floor plans carefully, and always find a builder that you are comfortable with. It’s easier to work with someone who is open to your suggestions and will do their best to make your dreams come true. When you are going over the plans for your new luxury home, give the builder a good overall picture. For example, if you like to entertain, tell the builder, so he can help you design a house that is good for entertaining.

You can add all of the newest materials to the build, plus have the best technology built into the house, such as a security system, hidden safes, a storm shelter, automation and top-notch appliances.

If you are looking for a smaller lot, be sure to find a lot large enough for landscaping you want, a pool and other outdoor amenities. If you are looking for acreage, space isn’t a factor, unless the piece of property sits on a mountain and the only home site is too small for the house you want. Keep in mind what you want to do with the property, including adding stables or other buildings – you’ll need room for those buildings.


Photo by Daniel Tuttle on Unsplash

Buying a home, especially for the first time, might feel a little scary—notably if you've learned the home you’re considering for purchase is a zombie property. Even a pro at buying property may flinch when they initially hear this term.

No worries, a zombie property is not as frightening as it sounds. It’s a common term used in the housing industry, originating back to the 2007-08 housing crisis when tens of thousands of these homes were left behind because their owners couldn’t afford to make their mortgage payments.

What is a Zombie Property?

A zombie property creeps up when no one retains accountability for it. It usually occurs when homeowners leave their homes after receiving a foreclosure notice and incorrectly believe they must immediately vacate the property. They often don't realize there is an entire foreclosure process, one that doesn’t happen overnight. In most instances, they believe the lender that sent the notice will take over responsibility for the property, so they move out. In some cases, they do know they can stay but choose not to delay the inevitable and cut loose in search of greener pastures.

Meanwhile, the lender, for whatever reason, doesn’t complete the foreclosure process they initiated and the property stands abandoned. Since the homeowner has already walked away not realizing they still technically own the property, and the lender also doesn’t assume ownership, no one takes responsibility for the home. It essentially sits in a state of limbo—hence it being referred to as a “zombie.” Its ownership is not quite alive (abandoned), but not yet dead (foreclosed upon) either.

Pros of Purchasing a Zombie Property

The primary benefit of purchasing a zombie property is the price. Most of these properties are typically sold below market value, sometimes at rock bottom prices. Because some of them are eyesores, or have the potential to become attractive to squatters, municipalities and towns are eager to get these homes rehabbed and inhabited. This means buyers who are handy with repairs or who have the investment money available to fix up and flip the home for a profit can make out handsomely with this type of sale.

Cons of Purchasing a Zombie Property

While the financial benefits associated with zombie homes are lucrative, there are some potential pitfalls to be careful of when considering a purchase. In most instances, the original owner still retains the title to the home, so this legal detail will need to be addressed. Buyers also have to consider these homes may have deterioration, unsafe conditions or be unsanitary. This is especially a concern for properties that have been abandoned for a long period of time. Additionally, it takes more effort to navigate a zombie property purchase than a traditional foreclosure since no one is actively involved with the property.

Many potential buyers intentionally or inadvertently overlook zombie properties, but if you’re in the market, it’s not an option you should automatically discount. Don't let the zombie moniker fool you.  If you perform your due diligence and find ways to mitigate any drawbacks, you could potentially land yourself a great home, rental investment, or profitable house-flip.




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